Consumer watchdog “doesn’t come after anyone’s gas stoves”

A federal official is clarifying his comments about a possible ban on gas furnaces after a media frenzy.

Seeing the words “ban” with regard to gas furnaces was likely alarming to the 40% of households in the country that have gas appliances, Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers Jill Notini told FOX Business.

Rich Trumka Jr., one of five commissioners of the US Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), had suggested that an outright ban on new gas furnaces was on the table amid growing concerns about indoor air pollution, according to multiple reports.

GAS OVEN BAN ‘ON THE TABLE’ FOR FEDERAL AGENCY: REPORTS

Richard Trumka head shot

Richard L. Trumka Jr. is a commissioner of the US Consumer Product Safety Commission. (Consumer Product Safety Commission)

Natural gas and propane furnaces, according to the California Air Resources Board, can release harmful pollutants such as carbon monoxide and formaldehyde into the air, which can be toxic to people and pets.

Trumka walked back his comments on Twitter Monday after an uproar over the proposal, saying the agency “isn’t going after anybody’s gas stoves.”

“My guiding duty is to protect the health and safety of consumers. Gas furnaces can emit dangerous levels of toxic chemicals — even when not in use,” Trumka tweeted in part, adding that the agency “will consider all approaches to regulation.”

THIS IS THE CLIMATE CHANGE SCIENCE THAT MAKES AGENDA PUSHERS ‘LOADED’: JIMMY FAILLA

The CPSC told FOX Business on Tuesday that the agency “has not proposed any action on gas furnaces and that ‘any regulatory action by the commission would involve a lengthy process.’

To even make a formal proposal, they would have to start a regulatory process, which hasn’t started yet, Notini said.

The CPSC said it has “plans to begin gathering data and perspectives from the public on potential hazards associated with gas furnaces, and proposed solutions to those hazards, later this year.”

The agency — which works to protect the public from unreasonable risks of serious injury or death from consumer products under its jurisdiction — also says it will continue to work with voluntary standards organizations to investigate gas furnace emissions and address potential hazards.

JOE MANCHIN SAYS POSSIBLE GAS FURNACE CURSES A ‘RECIPE FOR DISASTER’

gas stove

A gas stove emits a blue flame inside a domestic kitchen in Barcelona. (Davide Bonaldo/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images/Getty Images)

While Trumka’s comments raised concerns, consumers need to remember “that the commission is a body. There are multiple commissioners … so they will make decisions together,” Notini said in an effort to ease consumers’ concerns.

Like all federal agencies, the CPSC has a regulatory process they must follow. “They can’t just ‘ban’ devices,” she added.

However, Notini said the issue of indoor air quality has been “top of mind” and that a “discussion around electrification to address climate change has certainly been in the works for some time.”

Electrification refers to the process of replacing technologies that use fossil fuels with technologies that use electricity as an energy source, according to Resources for the Future.

US AUTHORITIES SAY ALL AMERICANS WILL PAY A LOT MORE FOR NATURAL GAS THIS WINTER

Notini said a group of experts, including those from the CPSC, AHAM and EPA, have been meeting regularly for over a year to examine the effects of cooking on indoor air equity.

The aim is for this examination process to be “based in science and in original studies and research.”

– We do not want any conclusions about a product category that almost half of the country uses based on a larger political debate about the electrification of the country, she added. “Proposals should be based on studies that are representative of real-world testing and use.”

Meanwhile, when cooking, Notini says people should use ventilation hoods, ceiling fans or even crack a window while cooking.

“We know that ventilation has an impact on indoor air quality,” she said. “It’s a simple … realistic step that people can take while they’re in the kitchen.”

NATURAL GAS PRICES ‘SPORADIC AND COULD START TO FALL’

GET FOX BUSINESS ON THE GO BY CLICKING HERE

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *